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  1. #196
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

    Default

    More progress. I am excite!

    So last night I got some more front end assembly done. Things are very slow going because there are no instructions, just bags and bags of parts with nothing telling you where anything goes. And there are no videos of this particular Speedway front end getting put together online, at least none that I could find. So I had to rely on basic mechanical aptitude, and I referenced photos of stock Model A suspension that I could find online and look for parts that were similar.

    Here are about 75% of the parts that go into the front end. This is all the hardware for spindles, steering, and brakes.

    20180417_184141_HDR by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    I got the spindles on, along with caliper mounts and steering arms.

    20180417_180415 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180417_180427 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180417_193925 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180417_193919 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    Then after the steering arms were mounted to the spindles I put the steering arm on there that connects the two sides.

    20180417_200613 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180417_200624 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    The extra hole on the passenger side steering arm is for the pitman arm. On traditional style Model A's the pitman arm is short and connects to the drivers side steering arm. But that old way has some downfalls. So I am going with the newer way of doing it where the pitman arm crosses the chassis and connects to the passenger side steering arm.

    20180417_200619 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    Then I started to mount up the disc brakes, but there is an adaptor that needs to be press fit onto the spindles. I asked around on facebook if I knew anyone that could press them on. Several people chimed in and told me to just bake the adaptors and chill the spindles. So I did just that. I threw the spindles out in the snow on my deck for about 30 minutes. During that time I threw the adaptors into the oven and baked them at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

    After doing this the adaptors slid right on.

    I would post before and after pics of this adaptor thing, but I took those two photos with the Facebook app, so they didn't get saved to my phone.

  2. #197
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Elk River/Big Lake
    Posts
    4,454
    Car
    82 Cabriolet, 71 Fastback

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    You're going to have this thing together in no time! Any plans to coat the various raw suspension parts?

  3. #198
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by euro View Post
    You're going to have this thing together in no time! Any plans to coat the various raw suspension parts?
    Progress looks fast now. But the rear suspension will not be as quick and easy.

    For the rear suspension I have to take my rear axle and cut off all the original mounts and brackets. Then I have to position it under the frame and figure out where to weld on all the new stuff. The rear suspension isn't just a kit I can assemble. Bright side though is it is fun to cut and weld.

    I am leaving everything raw so it can rust.

  4. #199
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

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    Made more progress last night.

    Remember that toolbox that was completely covered in parts? Here it is now.

    20180418_205916 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    What I got done last night was I put the spindles back on after having to take them off to get some press fit bearing adaptors on them. When I put the spindles back on, I added some grease to the bearings that go under them, just to be sure.

    Then I had to prep the brake rotors for install. The inner bearing race had to be hammered out and replaced with one that came in the kit. When I got the original race out though it appeared to be identical. It must be a super minor difference or something. Anyways, here are a couple pics of that process.

    Rotor and related parts.
    20180418_185148 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    Old race hammered out.
    20180418_185644 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    New race hammered in.
    20180418_190109 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    Inner bearing before and after grease.
    20180418_190123 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180418_190456 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    Bearing dropped in.
    20180418_190647 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    And rotor installed.
    20180418_192903 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    So now the front suspension is all assembled except for the brake calipers, hoses, and pitman arm. I won't bother installing any of that until I get to the point where I need it. So then I threw the front wheels and tires on it and snapped a couple pics.

    20180418_201235 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180418_201239 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    After that I started working on the new front suspension crossmember. This frame was setup to run a suicide front suspension, so the front suspension crossmember has been removed. I was going to run a suicide front suspension, but I have decided to set the chassis up a little more traditional style. So the front axle will go under the frame.

    The crossmember has 2" less drop than a stock crossmember, to add to my suspension drop. I had to drill a hole in it for the leaf spring and grind some notches in the flanges for the u-bolts because the flanges were too tall. I got the crossmember properly attached to the front suspension, now I need to figure out where in the frame I want it so I can cut it to length and weld it in.

    20180418_204429 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180418_205842 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    I think it is going to go right about here. The top of the crossmember is supposed to be level with the top of the frame. So I'll cut it to length and fit it in there.

    20180418_205825 by Chad Truss, on Flickr



    And one final pic of the front suspension.

    20180418_205957 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    Progress is going to slow down now because I can't just assemble shit. The rest of the front suspension work, and nearly all of the rear suspension work, is fabrication instead of assembly.

  5. #200
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

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    Made some more progress last weekend.

    The front suspension crossmember is universal, so I had to locate it and trim it to fit in between the frame tubes, before I could weld it in. In most pics I could find, the crossmember is welded in flush with the top of the frame. But since there will be some rake to the frame, and there will be about 7 degrees of caster, and the caster angle of the front axle drives the angle the front leaf spring is mounted at, I thought it would be a good idea to lean the crossmember back a little. So I took the 7 degrees the caster will be set at and rounded it up to 10 degrees to account for frame rake.

    Measured twice, cut once. Then fit and tacked in the crossmember.

    20180428_154837 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180428_161454 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    Here is about how the grill will sit. I will probably have to trim it so it sits lower in the frame to match the body, or shorten it. This grille is for a truck I think, so it is taller.

    20180428_164925 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    Then I jacked the back of the frame up and rolled the rear axle in place. Here is now the car would sit as assembled so far.

    20180428_163451 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180428_164241_HDR by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    Now this ride height is not crazy for a traditional style hot rod like what I am trying to do. I kinda like the rake how the rear is way up in the air. BUUUUT I think I have decided I need to z the frame a few inches in the back, and do what is called sweeping the frame, in the front.

    For those of you that don't know what z the frame means, here is a pic.
    This is a scale model frame, but it is a great illustration.


    Then here is a video that explains sweeping the frame.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=De6hJiiDxhA


    Once the frame is z'ed in the rear and swept in the front, this will allow the body of the car to sit lower but still make room for the front and rear suspension. Since the front suspension is also a solid axle, the car is currently as low as I can get it up front. So if I z the rear, the car might sit too flat. I want some rake.

    So, I get to modify the frame. WWEEEEEEE

    And finally, once I got a good look at how high the frame will sit, even though it is lowered quite a bit in the front, I decided to channel the body. Originally I welded in the floor framework of the body so that it sat on the frame, like it would have when it was built. Well, now seeing how high up the frame is I cut the floor tubes out and put in new ones that are 3 " higher up. So now the body will sit down over the frame by 3".

    New floor tubes.
    20180429_190614 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    This photo shows one of the cross tubes where the floor used to be. The tubes entering the frame from the sides are for the new higher floor.
    20180429_180947 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    From the side. The tube would sit on the frame, body would hang down over the sides.
    20180429_181006 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

  6. #201
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

    Default

    Sorry if I go too far into explaining stuff. I get a lot of "Whats that?" responses when I say things like "Z the frame."

  7. #202
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

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    Got a great deal on a steering wheel.

    20180507_111056 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

  8. #203
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,494
    Car
    16 Golf R / 92 Golf

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    Lookin' like a nice setup is coming together. I don't know why, but I love a good bearing & rotor job. I've done three GM setups so far and love it.

  9. #204
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

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    I pulled the front axle and leaf spring out of it. I don't like how it sits and how it looks, so I am returning them. Speedway is awesome about returns. Send them back for whatever reason, I just have to pay for shipping.

    I ordered up an I-Beam axle and a better front spring. Should be here tomorrow and I'll install on Wednesday I hope.

    Once I have the front end back together I will try to set the body on it and see exactly what I want to do to the frame to get it sitting how I want it.

  10. #205
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Otseghoe
    Posts
    1,621
    Car
    06 A3

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    never really thought much about buying one of those bearing packing devices, but damn it sure looks like very little clean up. although if i do one i usually where gloves but still a bunch of waste usually.
    looks good are you going to powder coat?

  11. #206
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

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    Quote Originally Posted by VR6GTI View Post
    never really thought much about buying one of those bearing packing devices, but damn it sure looks like very little clean up. although if i do one i usually where gloves but still a bunch of waste usually.
    looks good are you going to powder coat?
    The bearing Packer thing is great! Makes it so easy. It does waste a lot of grease though, but since I was assembling from scratch I put the leftover grease on the spindle.

    I'm leaving everything in bare metal. I want the rust.

  12. #207
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

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    The I-beam axle is on back order. Should be in any day now.

    The spring is a little beefier for a Model A instead of the lighter T Bucket cars. It also have less arch so I can get the front end a little lower.

    Also, I thought I was being smart when I welded in the front suspension crossmember in leaned back at an angle since the frame will be kicked up a little and the suspension will be leaned back some. Allowing the leaf spring to be more inline with the way the suspension travels. NOPE. I need to weld the crossmember in square to the frame because of the radius rods. So I ordered up another crossmember.

    While the suspension is not attached to the frame, now is the perfect time to z the back of the frame, and completely weld on the new front crossmember. So I'll do all that before I put the new front suspension in.

  13. #208
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Elk River/Big Lake
    Posts
    4,454
    Car
    82 Cabriolet, 71 Fastback

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    Quote Originally Posted by toasted View Post
    Sorry if I go too far into explaining stuff. I get a lot of "Whats that?" responses when I say things like "Z the frame."
    nah you're good, I like reading this thread because of the technical stuff. same reason i still subscribe to grassroot motorsports magazine.

  14. #209
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,035
    Car
    '12 Tiguan, '30 Chevy

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    Small update.

    Got started on the rear frame Z. I am doing a 3" Z. Where I cut the frame it is 3" tall, so I am basically just moving the rear portion up one frame height. Here is how far I got. I have the step up sections done on both sides, now I need to weld the rear portion of the frame back on and add a gusset to the bottom that will kinda match what I did on the top there.

    20180609_144254 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180609_162343 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

    20180609_162338 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


    I got the Model A Super Glide spring and Super Bell I Beam drop axle for the front suspension. But something isn't working right with the way the kingpins are installed now that I have different parts. Everything should work, but something isn't right.

    Good thing Back to the 50's is next weekend, because the hot rod places I am buying parts from are coming to me basically. So I can bring my parts in and find out what is wrong, and then buy the right stuff right then and there.

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